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[单选题]It was two years ago today that the hunting ban came into force, supposedly ending centuries of tradition. However, the law has been an unmitigated failure-not that either side is shouting about it. It was a nightmare vision that struck fear and loatlung into the hearts of millions. When the hunting ban became law, it was said, 16,000 people would lose their jobs, thousands of hounds would be put down, rotting carcasses would litter the countryside, hedgerows would disappear, riders would face on-the-spot fines, law-abiding people from doctors to bamsters would be dragged from their horses and carted off to prison, while dog owners would be prosecuted if their mutt caught a rabbit. These were just some of the claims as desperate countryside campaigners battled to save their sport in the lead-up to the hunting ban, which Labour rammed into law using the Parliament Act on November 18 , 2004. For many, the fears were real. Others exaggerated as they fought an increasingly aggressive antihunting lobby which had rejected acres of independent evidence affirming that hunting is the most humane way of killing foxes. In the battle to "fight prejudice, fight the ban" , every emotive argument was deployed. For its part, the anti-hunting brigade extravagantly claimed that the ban would put an end to the rich parading in red jackets. A senior Labour MP, Peter Bradley, admitted in this newspaper that it was, as many suspected, about "class war". He lost his seat shortly afterwards. But people in red coats did not disappear. In fact, none of the forecasts came true. What did happen was something nobody had predicted: the spectacular revival and growth of hunting with hounds. In short, the hunting ban has been a failure. Today, on the second anniversary of the ban's coming into force on February 18, 2005, new figures show that participation in the sport has never been higher. It is so cheerful that two new packs have been formed, something that has not happened for centuries. They include the seductively named Private Pack, set up by the fmancier Roddy Fleming in Gloucestershire. It operates on an invitation-only basis, a sort of hunting private members' club. This can only mean one thing: like it or not, hunting is cool. Young people are taking it up, enticed by the element of rebellion and the mystique of what actually happens as hunts attempt to keep within the law. 26. The hunting ban has been a complete failure because
[单选题]There is virtually no limit to how one can serve community interests,from spending a few hours a week with some charitable organization to practically fulltime work for a social agency. Just as there are opportunities for voluntary service 71 (VSO) for young people before they take up full-time employment, 72 there are opportunities for overseas service for 73 technicians in developing countries. Some people, 74 those who retire early, 75 their technical and business skills in countries 76 there is a special need. So in considering voluntary or 77 community service there are more opportunities than there 78 were when one first began work. Most voluntary organizations have only a small fulltime 79 ,and depend very much on volunteers and part-timers. This means that working relationships are different from those in commercial organizations,and values may be different. 80 some ways they may seem more casual and less efficient,but one should not 81 them by commercial criteria. The people who work with them do so for different reasons and with different 82 ,both personal and 83 . One should not join them 84 to arm them with professional expertise;they must be joined with commitment to the 85 ,not business efficiency. Because salaries are 86 or non-existent many voluntary bodies offer modest expenses. But many retired people take part in community service for 87 ,simply because they enjoy the work. Many community activities possible 88 retirement were also possible during one’s working life but they are to be undertaken 89 seriously for that. Retired people who are just looking for something different or unusual to do should not consider 90 community service. 80选 80.
[单选题]Section B Directions : In this section., you are required to read jive short paragraphs and decide which of the five titles marked A, B, C, D an,d E is the best suited to each of them. Choose the best answer and mark your answer on the Answer Sheet. Kiwis are flightless birds endemic to New Zealand, and by far the smallest living ratites and lay the largest egg in relation to their body size of any species of bird in the world. 41 The kiwi is synonymous with New Zealand, so much so that Australians endearingly refer to New Zealanders as "kiwi" -people from the Land of the Kiwi. This unique bird, recognizable by its short squat body and elongated beak, is under threat. Its small, clawlike wings render the kiwi flightless; it must of necessity live on the grounD. The kiwi is thus easy prey to marauding enemies such as humans and mammals. . 42 When the great land mass of the south split 75 million years ago, the kiwi and many other grou"dliving bird species became separated from predatory mammals within what was later to become Know as New ZealanD.The birds were able to multiply and flourish because there were very few mammals land-locked within the islands. Kiwis have evolved certain mammalian characteristics over time, living on the ground and free as they were from attack by mammals. 43 However, when the Polynesians amved about l,000 years ago bringing with them dogs and rats, the kiwi population and other vulnerable bird species soon suffered a severe reduction in numbers. The coming of the Europeans in the eighteenth century brought even more determined predators, including the cat and, especially, the stoat-a kind of weasel introduced to control rabbits. The stoat is a very vicious and efficient killer of kiwis. 44 There are six types of kiwis, and all six are threateneD.Two are "critically endangered" because they have populations of less than 250 mature birds. Two are "endangered" meaning that it is estimated that within three generations their numbers will have declined by 50%. The other two are designated "vulnerable" -one because its habitat is shrinking, the other because it is potentially under threat from stoats and other mammals. 45 100 years ago there were more than 5 million North Island Brown Kiwis. Today, there are probably around 30,000 and the population is decreasing at a rate of 6u/o a year. Only the Little Spotted Kiwi is increasing because of successful attempts to transfer the creature to predator-free offshore islands. There are further reasons for hope. Trapping predators and rearing baby chicks for later release into the wild can have a dramatic effect on kiwi numbers; but it will be necessary to do so on a large scale. It would be tragic if New Zealand were to lose its national symbol, the kiwi. Surely the strangest bird in existence, unable to fly, it sniffs out its food with a remarkably strong sense of smell. Its legs are powerful and muscular, for the kiwi is a burrower living in dens-some species even preferring tunnels, yet another similarity it shares with some mammals. But it cannot share its habitat with them without eventually losing the battle for survival.
[单选题]There is virtually no limit to how one can serve community interests,from spending a few hours a week with some charitable organization to practically fulltime work for a social agency. Just as there are opportunities for voluntary service 71 (VSO) for young people before they take up full-time employment, 72 there are opportunities for overseas service for 73 technicians in developing countries. Some people, 74 those who retire early, 75 their technical and business skills in countries 76 there is a special need. So in considering voluntary or 77 community service there are more opportunities than there 78 were when one first began work. Most voluntary organizations have only a small fulltime 79 ,and depend very much on volunteers and part-timers. This means that working relationships are different from those in commercial organizations,and values may be different. 80 some ways they may seem more casual and less efficient,but one should not 81 them by commercial criteria. The people who work with them do so for different reasons and with different 82 ,both personal and 83 . One should not join them 84 to arm them with professional expertise;they must be joined with commitment to the 85 ,not business efficiency. Because salaries are 86 or non-existent many voluntary bodies offer modest expenses. But many retired people take part in community service for 87 ,simply because they enjoy the work. Many community activities possible 88 retirement were also possible during one’s working life but they are to be undertaken 89 seriously for that. Retired people who are just looking for something different or unusual to do should not consider 90 community service. 85选 85.
[单选题]For more than 10 years there has been a bigger rise in car crime than in most other types of crime. An average of more than two cars a minute are broken into,vandalized(破坏)or stolen in the UK. Car crime accounts for almost a third of all reported offences with no signs that the trend is slowing down. Although there are highly professional criminals involved in car theft,almost 90 percent of car crime is committed by the opportunist. Amateur thieves are aided by our carelessness. When the Automobile Association(AA)engineers surveyed one town centre car park last year,10 percent of cars checked were unlocked,a figure backed up by a Home Office national survey that found 12 percent of drivers sometimes left their cars unlocked. The vehicles are sitting in petrol stations while drivers pay for their fuel. The AA has discovered that cars are left unattended for an average of three minutes—and sometimes much longer—as drivers buy drinks,cigarettes and other consumer items and then pay at the counter. With payment by credit card more and more common,it is not unusual for a driver to be out of his car as long as six minutes providing the car thief with a golden opportunity. In an exclusive AA survey,carried out at a busy garage on a main road out of London,300 motorists were questioned over three days of the holiday period. 24 percent admitted that they“always”or“sometimes”leave the keys in the car. This means that nationwide,a million cars daily become easy targets for the opportunist thief. The AA recommends locking up whenever you leave the car—and for however short a period. A partially open sunroof or window is a further come-on to thieves. Leaving valuables in view is an invitation to the criminal. A Manchester probationary (假释期)service research project,which interviewed almost 100 car thieves last year,found many would investigate a coat thrown on a seat. Never leave any documents showing your home address in the car. If you have a garage,use it and lock it—a garaged car is at substantially less risk. There are many other traps to avoid. The Home Office has found little awareness among drivers about safe parking. Most motorists questioned made no efforts to avoid parking in quiet spots away from street lights—just the places thieves love. The AA advises drivers to park in places with people around-thieves do not like audiences. 64. The best way for a driver to avoid car theft is .
[单选题]As 170 people sat down to dinner ,I breathed a sigh of relief: The conference was Going well, Running it was part of my job as a university program manager, working on a project to boost biotech collaborations between academia and industry. When I started in the role a few years earlier, I thought that maybe, after years of career exploration, I had finally found the right job for me. But at the conference, I found myself wondering whether that was really what i wanted from my career. I'm a scientist not an event planner--but I had been too busy organizing the conference to appreciates the research being discussed. Was it time for yet another change? I started off as a lab scientist. but then discovered that the highly focused nature of lab work wasn't for me. My next job was at a pharmaceutical company-conducting literature searches. i enjoyed the work, which allowed me to stay close to research and interact with a variety of people. But I was only offered a short-term contract so after a year I had to move on. I, then became 'a" scientific journal editor. I love the breadth of science that I was exposed to, but the job required a lengthy commute. So, I made another dramatic change and moved back to the ivory tower for my current job. It had become a pattern: I spent a few years in each role only to find that it Wasn’t quite the right fit. I also realized that maybe I was searching for something that didn't exist. I began to think about creative ways to add the scientific stimulation I sought to my work life. With my previous knowledge and my experience as an editor, I realized I had the skill set to do that through freelance science writing, such as news articles for journals and blogs With my former colleagues positive responses, I finally decided I could do my university job on a less than full-time schedule. Fortunately, my manager agreed. For the last year, I have been a university program manager/freelance writer, and I’ve never been happier .Weaving the two roles together has been a bit tricky at times, But I finally feel have a career that is tailored to my needs I’ve realized that a career doesn’t need to be “off the shelf”,Jobs can be mixed and matched to get to one that fits. 21. What did the author think of his conference organizing job in Paragraph 1?
[单选题]Imagine that you’re a fly. You’re just looking for a place to rest,when you see a nice pink leaf. That looks like a nice place to land. As you rest your feet on the leaf, you notice something strange .This leaf is hairy. You begin to make your move, but you trigger the plant’s reaction. Snap! In one-tenth of a second, you are caught in the Venus flytrap. You will be digested in five to twelve days. Out of about 391,000 plant species in the world, only 600 or so are carnivorous. We call them this because they attract, trap,and eat bugs. Like other plants, they get energy from the sun. But unlike other plants, they get their nutrients from their prey (猎物).Carnivorous plants live in places where the soil lacks nutrients. Most plants get nutrients from the soil. Carnivorous plants have turned to other sources. Pitcher plants trick their prey into landing on them. They offer nectar (花蜜)bribes to the foolish insects that would take them. True to their name, pitcher plants have deep chambers. Their landing surface is slippery. They have inward pointing hairs, making it hard to escape. The fly lands on the pitcher plant to eat but slips into a pit filled with digestive fluids. Corkscrew plants have inviting stems. Curved hairs line the inside of these stems. These hairs allow insects to go up the stems, but not back. Going forward leads to the plant's stomach. Bugs who wander into the corkscrew plant find that they are unable to escape. They must march to their own death. And then there are the bladderworts. They live in water and float near the surface. Their traps are like small bladders(囊状物)hidden beneath the water. Only their flowers are visible from the surface. When bugs swim into the trigger hairs, the plant reacts. The bladder sucks up the prey and the water surrounding it. The prey will be digested within hours. Which statement would the author most likely agree with?